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How the Trump Jr. meeting fits into the larger Putin game plan *LINK* *PIC*

(CNN)Many in the media have focused too narrowly on how Donald Trump Jr.'s June 2016 meeting with a Russian lobbyist and lawyer in Trump Tower looks bad.

But what the media, the public and investigators should really focus on now is what happened after the meeting. The key is to think more broadly, including asking two questions.
First, assuming this was an overture by Russian intelligence agencies, despite the Kremlin's denials, what would the Russian government most likely have done next?

Second, how should we then interpret subsequent actions of the Trump circle in light of the actions the Kremlin would have pursued? The answers to those questions suggest that the alleged collusion between the Trump circle and Putin's team could well have continued far beyond June 9.
Instead, the media coverage seems geared toward making the meeting explicable in terms of an ill-advised, short, perhaps even forgettable meeting for which Donald Trump Jr. takes the heat. That narrative often also includes the idea that this may have been an independent, ill-conceived attempt on the part of a Russian lobbying group to provide what was ultimately fairly useless information about Hillary Clinton.

How the Trump Jr. meeting fits into the larger Putin game plan
By Ryan Goodman and Rolf Mowatt-Larssen
Updated 1:12 PM ET, Sun July 16, 2017
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Mowatt-Larssen & Goodman: We need to focus more attention on what happened after Donald Trump Jr. meeting with Russian lawyer
The pattern of activity suggests that the alleged collusion between the Trump team and the Kremlin continued far beyond June 9
Ryan Goodman is professor of law at New York University and co-editor-in-chief of Just Security, an online forum on national security law and policy. He served as special counsel to the general counsel of the Department of Defense from 2015 to 2016. You can follow him on Twitter @rgoodlaw. Rolf Mowatt-Larssen is the director of the Intelligence and Defense Project at Harvard's Belfer Center. He served as director of intelligence and counterintelligence at the Department of Energy 2005 to 2008 and as chief of the CIA's European Division 2004 to 2005 as part of a 23-year career in the CIA. The opinions expressed in this commentary are theirs.

(CNN)Many in the media have focused too narrowly on how Donald Trump Jr.'s June 2016 meeting with a Russian lobbyist and lawyer in Trump Tower looks bad.

But what the media, the public and investigators should really focus on now is what happened after the meeting. The key is to think more broadly, including asking two questions.
First, assuming this was an overture by Russian intelligence agencies, despite the Kremlin's denials, what would the Russian government most likely have done next?
Steve Israel: Most people would NOT have taken that meeting
Steve Israel: Most people would NOT have taken that meeting
Second, how should we then interpret subsequent actions of the Trump circle in light of the actions the Kremlin would have pursued? The answers to those questions suggest that the alleged collusion between the Trump circle and Putin's team could well have continued far beyond June 9.
Instead, the media coverage seems geared toward making the meeting explicable in terms of an ill-advised, short, perhaps even forgettable meeting for which Donald Trump Jr. takes the heat. That narrative often also includes the idea that this may have been an independent, ill-conceived attempt on the part of a Russian lobbying group to provide what was ultimately fairly useless information about Hillary Clinton.
We have focused on how the meeting bears all the hallmarks of a Russian intelligence operation and, in particular, a test to gauge whether the Trump campaign would be open to assistance from the Russian government.

In that event, Moscow got a green light. The only problem with the Russian attempt, according to Trump Jr. and the Russian lawyer, was that the quality of the information on Clinton was poor. Trump Jr. and his team apparently wanted more.

So why would the Kremlin provide nothing of value to the Trump principals and disappoint them, especially when we know that by May, according to the US intelligence report, Putin had in his possession what he needed from the DNC server?